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College & OF History: 1975-2000
Into the Third Millennium
Framlingham College...
By John Maulden

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Alex Henney is off to the North Pole again
Having walked to the North Pole last year, Alex Henney (Z84-95) has decided to partner with long time friend Simon Marshall, to now be the first to pilot a hovercraft to the same spot. The pair aim to attempt this world first in April of next year. Before then they will be preoccupied with raising funds to getting the expedition underway, preparing the hovercraft for the high Arctic temperatures and also preparing events for their selected charity, the Burnham-On-Sea Area Rescue Boat (BARB).

For more information on the trip, including how to support them, you can visit their website here or to see details of Alex’s previous trip to the North Pole last year, please click here

Although hovercraft have and continue to be used by the emergency services, the military and other government organisations in coastal areas where ice is present for at least part of the year, no trip has ever been undertaken of the duration and through the expected ice conditions that is expected will be encountered.

The team plans to depart the UK the weekend of 18th/19th April 2009. A week of training & acclimatisation will then be undertaken, before departing on the challenge the weekend of the 24th/25th April. The team aims to return to Resolute on approximately May 9th.

There are many advantages of travelling during this period. Primarily the weather conditions will not be as harsh. Temperatures will still be close to the -40 degrees, but the team will hopefully avoid the ferocious winter storms that lash that area of the Polar archipelago.



In order to navigate a path through the Polar rubble, the team will use GPS, and the latest high resolution satellite images to find their way through the particularly hostile environment. Though the distance from Resolute to the position of the magnetic North Pole is something close to 350 miles, the team are preparing to travel something closer to 500 miles to avoid the vicious rubble that the hovercraft will not be able to clear.